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Monday, March 20, 2017

No RunningWater in Lima, March 20, 2017

I stand in solidarity with the people of Peru
Backpacking means you don't run every time there is a disaster
Most wouldn't have the funds anyway to get out the next day, (lol)
Chalk it up as one of the wonderful experiences of life!

The Government of any country has a responsibility to provide clean water for the people

It is not a political issue, responding to this human need, that sustains life in all forms

It is a matter of life and death

It is the responsibility of the leaders, governing bodies, mayors, governors, THE PRESIDENT

To see that the only river that provides potable water in the country

IS NOT CONTAMINED BY CORPORATIONS

Lima has upward to ten million residents

I am adjusting for the moment

The burden of having to live without running water

The people are somewhat comfortable and relaxed

Because it happens often, that there is no water

With all of the problems in the world

Why does having potable water have to be one of them? (lol)

I am coming out of my slight depression

Buying bottle water because it is a choice, is one thing

Buying it because you need it for life saving matters

Is a different thing altogether and of magnitude proportions!



Lima: Rimac River contaminated by mining, study says

By Manuel Vigo

A new study carried out by Sedapal has found that 60 percent of pollution at the Rimac River – the most important source of potable water for Lima and Callao – is caused by mining activities.

Lima: Rimac River contaminated by mining, study says
Rimac River (Photo: Peru21/Reference)
A new study carried out by Sedapal has found that 60 percent of pollution at the Rimac River – the most important source of potable water for Lima and Callao – is caused by mining activities.

The study, quoted in Peru21, also found that household waste accounts for 25 percent of pollution in the river, and industrial waste accounts for 15 percent.

Sedapal specialist Godfredo Leon said the river was also affected by mudslides and rockslides that occur over the rainy season, and which affect the quality of the water.

Pollution at the Rimac, Leon said, begins near the town of Morococha, in the province of Huarochiri, about 100 kilometers east of Lima.

The town is home to several mining companies that discharge residue without any treatment, Peru21 reported.


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